UC Arts student wins top prize in 2017 New Zealand Student Awards

08 September 2017

UC B.A. student Ashley Stuart has won the top student prize for Arts and Humanities in the 2017 New Zealand Student Awards

  • Ashley Stuart receiving 2017 NZ Top Student Award

    Ashley Stuart receiving her award at the ceremony in Auckland

On the 6th of September, UC Bachelor of Arts student Ashley Stuart won the Arts and Humanities section of the 2017 New Zealand Top Student Awards. Beating competition from Auckland, Victoria, Waikato, Massey and Otago, Ashley won a $1,000 prize, contributed by Deloitte - one of the five large employers sponsoring the awards.

Seren Wilson, Principal Consultant at Talent Solutions, who co-ordinates the selection process for the awards, said “The successful finalists represent strong all-rounders” “While academic achievements are important, the selection process places equal emphasis on aspects like work and volunteering experience, communication skills, extra-curricular activities and awards and scholarships received”.

While studying toward a B.A. in Political Science and History at UC, Ashley has completed an internship to Thailand through the UC PACE programme, travelled to the Model EU event in Hong Kong, been the president of Canterbury’s UN Youth, and captained the UC A netball team.

Congratulations to Ashley on her latest success!

For further information please contact:

Margaret Agnew, Senior External Relations Advisor, University of Canterbury
Phone: +64 3 369 3631 | Mobile: +64 275 030 168margaret.agnew@canterbury.ac.nz
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