Why study Human Services?

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Human Services meets the needs of people working in the human services who are increasingly expected to have professional training and/or qualifications. The courses bridge the gap between academic courses, such as Sociology and Political Science, and professional courses like Social Work, Speech-Language Therapy, and Clinical Psychology.

Pathways of study

There are five broad pathways within the Human Services programme at UC:

  • Health and Family Systems – for those interested in health and wellbeing
  • Work and Organisational Systems – gain knowledge to implement change in organisational systems, to consider critical debates within policy, as well as to develop skills in organisational communication
  • Youth Development – looks at youth culture and youth work and relevant development organisations
  • Local and Global Community Development – an area of growing popularity in New Zealand and overseas
  • Violence and Criminal Justice Systems – many Human Services courses make use of UC staff specialisation in the areas of violence and provision of services across different contexts. Most of these courses consider violence as a contemporary and historical issue.

The five areas and complementary courses are suggested pathways rather than prescriptive.

Students majoring in subjects such as Psychology, Law, Education, Management and Sociology also have the opportunity to strengthen the human service component of their studies by including HSRV courses. Human Services students can complement their major with courses from other Arts, Science, Law and Commerce subjects.

Careers in Human Services

Our graduates find employment in a wide range of careers including policy analysis, research, administration, management, supervision, community development, youth work, and various types of support work.  

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