UC physicists take a (nano) chip off the old block

22 February 2017

Computer components can't just keep getting smaller forever. So how then does the computer continue to become faster, lighter and more energy efficient?


Computer components can’t just keep getting smaller forever. So how then does the computer continue to become faster, lighter and more energy efficient? A team of University of Canterbury physicists think they have the answer – in the human brain.

Using a network of nano-particles, the UC team is hoping to mimic some of the brain’s functionality to enhance future computer technology, with help from a Marsden Fast Start Grant of $300,000.

“Our brain can do amazing things,” UC physicist Dr Saurabh Bose says. 

“Our basic idea is to take inspiration from the architecture of the brain and use that to make future revolutionary computer chips.”

Dr Saurabh Bose, Senior Research Fellow and Principal Investigator, Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, discusses his research into Brain Inspired On-chip Computation Using Self-assembled Nanoparticles in the above video.

For further information please contact:
Margaret Agnew, Senior External Relations Advisor, University of Canterbury
Phone: +64 3 369 3631 | Mobile: +64 275 030 168 | margaret.agnew@canterbury.ac.nz
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