Forensic Science

Chromosome on DNA background

Forensic science applies scientific methods and principles to matters of the law. Forensic scientists use science to solve crimes, gather DNA evidence, recover digital documents, help police find or eliminate suspects, and more.

Do you like a good mystery? Have you got an eye for detail? Are you interested in crime and justice? If so, a career in forensic science could be for you.

Work in forensic science and you could:

  • Help police solve crimes
  • Visit crime scenes and conduct detailed examinations
  • Analyse evidence such as DNA, blood, hair, fingerprints or weapons
  • Investigate tax fraud and cyber crime
  • Support rehabilitation of criminal offenders

Where do I start?

The minimum requirement for most forensic science jobs is a Bachelor of Science (BSc) majoring in the area of forensics you want to specialise in. A BSc is just the beginning. You could boost your career options further by gaining a postgraduate degree.

There are a range of subjects you can study within a BSc that can lead onto a career in forensic science. For example, if you’re into DNA you might like to study Biochemistry or, if you’re interested in the criminal mind, you could think about majoring in Psychology.

Bachelor of Science in Psychology

Psychology uses research, observation and rigorous testing of ideas to give scientific explanations for human behaviours and the mental processes behind them. Forensic or criminal psychologists specialise in applying psychological knowledge to legal matters, both in the criminal and civil arenas.

If you’re interested in this area of forensic science could do a BSc in Psychology; with Linguistics, Biochemistry and Sociology as additional subjects. 

Degree Structure

This table outlines the range of courses you can take to complete a BSc in Psychology.  There is some flexibility in the courses you can do for this degree. See our Student Advisors for help with this.

(1) Students may select a 100-level CMDS paper of their choice.

Transferable skills

Critical thinking, data analysis, Inter-disciplinary experience and knowledge, report writing and case study analysis, practical research skills.

Postgraduate study

Bachelor of Science with Honours (BSc (Hons)), Postgraduate Diploma in Clinical Psychology (PGDipGST), Postgraduate Diploma in Science (PGDipSc), Master of Science (MSc).

Career options

Behavioural analysts, computer forensics, crime scene investigator, criminal profiler, electronic crime analyst, fingerprint officers, forensic psychologist, forensic scientist, forensic serologist, forensic toxicologist, mediator.

Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry

Biochemistry examines the complex processes happening within living organisms including proteins, cell walls, DNA, RNA and more. Biochemistry is an increasingly useful tool in forensic investigations thanks to advances in DNA analysis and genetic sequencing.

If you’re interested in this area of forensic science you could do a BSc in Biochemistry; with Chemistry, Psychology and Biology as additional subjects. 

Degree Structure

This table outlines the range of courses you can take to complete a BSc in Biochemistry.  There is some flexibility in the courses you can do for this degree. See our Student Advisors for help with this.

Year 1

(1) Students may select a 100-level CMDS paper of their choice.

Transferable skills

Critical thinking, data analysis, field experience including health and safety awareness, inter-disciplinary experience and knowledge, practical research skills, report writing and case study analysis.

Postgraduate study

Bachelor of Science with Honours (BSc (Hons)),  Postgraduate Diploma in Science (PGDipSc), Master of Science (MSc).

Career options

Analytical chemist, biomedical scientist, crime scene investigator, lab technician, forensic chemist, forensic serologist, forensic toxicologist.

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